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  Gaius Valerius Catullus     
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Catullus Forum

Main  ::  Translations - all  ::  Perpetual fame after death (Uncategorized)

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AuthorMessage
chadtroutman
Posted on Fri Nov 19, 2004 17:18:05  
I heard that Catullus spoke of immortal fame after death in one of his first poems but I am having trouble finding it or pulling it out of the text. Has anyone else noticed this in his poems or know of any other roman authors who spoke of perpetual fame?
Lasse Pedersen
Posted at Sun Nov 21, 2004 23:57:07  Quote
As far as I know, Catullus does not mention perpetual fame. Pro tempore, I cannot recall any Roman authors who mentions this either, but I do recall several Greeks who have done so. Take Homer for example: in the Iliad, Achilleus does not fight for the sake of neither Agamamnon nor the people of Greece, but for his own fame - his perpetual fame! Further more, the winners at the ancient Olympics won naught but a crown of olive branches. However, they were perpetually famous, which was what one strived for in Ancient Greece!
Salve! I am Lasse Pedersen, a 18-year-old student from Denmark. I am a classical linguist at Silkeborg Amtsgymnasium and will finish my education there this summer. Then, it is off to France for app. 6 months and then back to the books at the University w
Rudy Negenborn
Posted at Mon Nov 22, 2004 00:04:44  Quote
Quote:
  If you have any questions what so ever,
just post them at this forum
Site manager
Guest
Posted at Wed Mar 30, 2005 08:22:16  Quote
How about the end of poem 1? That seems to be a wish for the immortality of his poetry, phrased in a modest/self-deprecating way.
Guest
Posted at Wed Mar 30, 2005 22:53:06  Quote
Horace, Carmina 3.30 makes a similar but stronger claim to poetic immortality.
Guest
Posted at Wed May 11, 2005 20:41:26  Quote
I don't think poem one is being modest. I think (learned) Catullus liked small literature - in a way he is insulting Cornellius.
Guest
Posted at Mon May 16, 2005 04:35:38  Quote
Catullus 1.9-10 is clearly a request for poetic immortality, as well as 14b.1-3 (numbering differs from edition to edition). Compare Horace Odes 1.35-36, and as mentioned above, passim Od. 3.30. Also, Ovid Metamorphoses xv.870-879. It's a common motif in Roman literature.
Guest
Posted at Sat May 24, 2008 00:17:42  Quote
plus uno maneat perenne saeclo!
let it last for more than one longlasting generation.
-line 10, poem #1

He's being a little humorous since he called them worthless scriblings in the lines before, but it is still clearly mentioned.
Guest
Posted at Mon Nov 03, 2008 00:28:26  Quote
Quote:
  I don't think poem one is being modest. I think (learned) Catullus liked small literature - in a way he is insulting Cornellius.

I think Catullus is genuinely praising Cornellius because all of history is a huge thing, and Cornellius compresses into just 3 books. But I agree that Poem 1 is not modest, why else would he tell the patron virgin that his work should endure more than one lifetime?
 


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