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Main  ::  Translations - all  ::  Audio files (Carmen 1)

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AuthorMessage
Guest
Posted on Mon Jul 23, 2007 21:21:38  
Great job. This site has happened to prove its usefullness more than once.
... the only flaws are the read poems audio-files: lots of mispronunciations. e.g.:

-ce- never reads /ke/ in Latin but /e/, that sound is bored instead by the following graphemes:

-che-: cherusycis, cheles. Usually in imported freign nouns.

-que-: the most spread form of the /ke/ sound. Although there are only medieval evidences about the production of -qu- it is still the first choice having to choose who sired all Neo-Latin omologues. Nevertheless we have no model for its classical pronunciation.
It still has the same form, with the sound of /k/, in French: que, qui; and Spanish: que, while in Italian it has the sound /k/ while the form changed in che, chi.

That is just to state that /k/ is such a strong kind of sound that if all Latin occurances of -ce- had bored it, it would have had serious consequences for all Neo-Latin languages.
In Italian instead, all other words maintaining their Latin forms in -ce- have a sweeter sound, that is /e/: pax, pacis... pace; facies, facies... faccia; preceptum, precepti, precetto.

--
Francesco
Chris Weimer
Posted at Tue Jul 24, 2007 17:10:10  Quote
You would be correct if you were speaking about Medieval Latin, but alas, at least a thousand years went by between Catullus and those Romance languages you cite. Medieval Latin and Catullan Latin are two different creatures, and I'm afraid you've mixed them up.
juan guillermo
Posted at Fri Nov 30, 2007 14:52:53  Quote
Yeah!

You have to know what are you speaking about before doing such commentary...

This latin website is the best of the best... I have been studing latin for 3 years at the university, and thanks to this Catullus "maison d' etudes" I have improved my latin... my love for the catullus poetry and the best of all is that you have the translation to many languages so you can test it from diferent points of view.

The audio mode... its great, and perhaps it doesn't respect always the "exametro", but the pronunciation, you can not talk about it...

Guillermo....
Guest
Posted at Sat Aug 22, 2009 00:13:54  Quote
Though that site is very useful and precise I have to defend the first guest: it's not that obvious that the pronunciation is right. There are two theory about the pronunciation in the antiquitiy and (because thousand years went by between Catullus and us as you said) we can't be sure which one they really used. And I'm a little confused about the 'ae' sound, too, is that really 'ai', as they pronunced it in the audio file?
 


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