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Catullus Forum

Main  ::  Translations - all  ::  Translation help (Carmen 6)

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AuthorMessage
Guest
Posted on Mon Jan 08, 2007 15:24:56  
I am directing a production of Edna St Vincent Millays poetry play Conversation at Midnight.
In it one of the characters says its all effututa.
This word which I understand can also be written as ecfututa seems to appear in a Catullus poem and as far as I can tell is a form of the 'F' word.
If someone can help with a meaning or translation I would be grateful
Paul Hecht
pauliehex@aol.com
Guest
Posted at Tue Jan 09, 2007 15:50:10  Quote
Hi, ecfututa appears in Carmen 6, so perhaps the translations of that carmen can help you...
Guest
Posted at Wed Jan 10, 2007 14:37:35  Quote
Yes, I got the same answer when using the "Search Translations" feature at this site
Guest
Posted at Thu Jan 11, 2007 19:42:51  Quote
Hi,

Funny, I'm also exploring this word for theatrical motivations... I'm an actor playing a part in Jordan Harrison's new play "Kid-Simple", in Washington, DC, and as a drunken, aged satyr must use to word "ecfututa" (and additionally, the rest of the line... "cur non tam latera ecfututa") to enchant a young boy-virgin in the forest. Yes, it sounds odd. From our context at least, I would agree that the word has "f-word" connotations! Interesting that Millay somehow used a variant of it - I'm a big fan of her work.

Best,
Jason McCool
Chris Weimer
Posted at Thu Jan 18, 2007 09:12:41  Quote
The "f-word" was futuo, perfect passive participle fututus. It's a bit more than merely "f-word" connotations - it was the "f-word".
Cambrinus
Posted at Sun Oct 09, 2011 20:43:01  Quote
Quote:
  The "f-word" was futuo, perfect passive participle fututus. It's a bit more than merely "f-word" connotations - it was the "f-word".

=====================================================
Not quite.The ec-prefix suggests that it means' all f**ked out'.
BmwaDict
Posted at Tue Apr 16, 2013 06:12:14  Quote
I would agree that the word has "f-word" connotations! Interesting that Millay somehow used a variant of it - I'm a big fan of her work.

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